SARTRE’S LA MAUVAISE FOI, THE NEGATION OF DE BEAUVOI’S MALAFIDE AND THE URBAN PHENOMENON IN THE MOVIE JULES ET JIM (1962) BY FRANCOIS TRUFFAUT

Fajar Muhammad Nugraha

Abstract

The intersubjectivity war between male and female individuals has long been a central issue in the realm of existentialism. Jean Paul Sartre with the idea of his La mauvaise foi demands every individual to be responsible in accepting the consequences for every decision that has been taken by man. Meanwhile, Simone De Beauvoir seeks to perfect Sartre's idea of existentialism by focusing the object of his idea on the freedom of women as human beings. On that basis, Beauvoir introduced the idea of malafide which is an inferior form of man. More specifically, Beauvoir assumes that there are many factors that cause woman to become a malafide. In the Jules et Jim (1962) film by François Truffaut, Catherine's character is presented as a form of denial of the malafide human- more specifically, the human in this context is female. This article describes the negation of Catherine's character as a malafide female, while at the same time showing the form of human existentialism as a whole. In addition to the issue of existentialism and existentialist feminism, this article also describes the urban phenomenon of time and place in the background setting of the film: Jules et Jim (1962) by François Truffaut.

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